Welcome to the Nestlé Baby Website

Welcome to our Baby Website where you’ll find lots of information on the wonderful journey of parenthood, from pregnancy, to birth and your child’s early development. Every child’s development is different, so be sure to consult with your health care professional if you have any concerns.

You’ll also find plenty of information about what you can feed your child.

Know your baby’s nutritional needs and download our 'Breastfeeding' brochure here

When it comes to babies, Breastfeeding is best, and provides the ideal balanced diet and protection against illness. During pregnancy and after delivery, a mother’s diet should contain sufficient key nutrients. Professional guidance can be sought on diet and the preparation for and maintenance of breastfeeding. Infant formula is intended to replace breast-milk when mothers do not breastfeed. A decision not to breast-feed, or to introduce partial bottle-feeding, could reduce the supply of breast-milk. Once reduced, it is difficult to re-establish. Infant formula should be prepared and used as directed. Unnecessary or improper use, such as the use of unboiled water, unboiled bottles or incorrect dilution may present a health hazard. Social and financial implications, such as the preparation requirements and the cost of providing formula until 12 months of age, should be considered when choosing how to feed infants.

Our Baby Website mentions food, toddler milks and sometimes infant formula.

By clicking on the "I understand" link below, you confirm your understanding that Nestlé is supplying this information about formulas for informational or educational purposes.

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Baby Poo

Your baby’s poo lets you know how well their digestive system is performing, and what is ‘normal’ is a source of common confusion for most parents. Basically, what goes in one end will determine what comes out the other! That means there is likely to be slight differences in poo between babies depending on their age and what food or milk is being ingested (breast, infant formula, solids or a combination). It is important to know what to expect in a nappy so you can then know when your baby’s poo is abnormal and may need healthcare professional advice.
  • Normal
    Baby Poo
  • Constipated
  • Diarrhoea
    in Baby

Normal Baby Poo

  1. Your baby’s very first bowel movement arrives in the first 24 hours and is called meconium. It is greenish-black, thick and sticky and consists of all the intestinal substances that an unborn fetus ingests while in the womb – epithelial cells, lanugo, mucus, amniotic fluid, bile and water.
  2. If your baby is breastfed, their poo will change into a more yellowish mustard colour (sometimes greenish or orange). It is a soft consistency and often unformed, with a sweet smell, and can occur at every nappy change or less often as the digestive system matures.  Breast fed babies don’t usually suffer from constipation unless there is an underlying health problem, consult your health care professional if you are concerned. If there is any jaundice (not uncommon in the early days and is characterized by yellow skin) poo could be pale until the jaundice is gone.
  3. If your baby is formula fed, their poo is generally firmer and may vary in colour ranging from yellow, green or brown depending on which type of formula they are on. They will be slightly more pungent smelling and frequency of poo’s may vary from several times per day to once per week depending on your baby and the type of formula they are on.
  4. If you are using a combination of breastfeeding and infant formula, your baby’s poo will vary between the descriptions above depending on the ratio of breast milk to infant formula.
  5. If your baby transitions from breastfeeding to infant formula or between formulas, it is normal for there to be changes in bowel motion including the texture and colour of your baby’s poo.

A baby’s poo is affected by a number of factors and the colour and consistency can change with many situations including;

  • Fluid intake
  • Introduction of solids
  • Age (as the age increases the stool characteristics change)
  • Illness and infections
  • Medications

If you are aware of what normal baby poo looks like, you will then know when something is not normal and may need further attention. Baby poo that is black (apart from their first poo), red or white always indicates the need for further assessment by a healthcare professional.

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